Tag Archives: shallot

Tilapia Rosso

This is just a SUPER simple red sauce preparation with Italian spices, lots of garlic, and a few shiitake mushrooms for fun. I added an egg  for a little extra protein boost. Sorry the pictures aren’t the best, it was a little sloppy on the plate, but it tasted great which is all that matters when it comes to busy middle of the week dinners!

Ingredients:

  • 5-7 cloves garlic
  • 2 shallots
  • 1-2 tablespoons coconut oil
  • 1 egg
  • 1/2 cup coconut flour
  • 1-2 lbs Tilapia (2 large filets)
  • About 14 oz strained Tomato
  • Basil, oregano, allspice, thyme, salt, pepper, red pepper flakes, paprika
  • 4-5 shiitake mushrooms, halved

Prep:

  1. Chop up your shallots, mushrooms, and garlic.
  2. Heat the coconut oil in a pan over med or med-high heat and add the garlic and shallots, cover and stir or shake occasionally
  3. Pat the tilapia with a paper towel, and place in a Ziploc bag with the coconut flour, tumble to coat
  4. Beat an egg and dip the fish filets in
  5. Place the filets in the pan and pour in any remaining egg and cover
  6. Add the tomato, and seasoning, going nice and heavy on the basil and oregano. Stir gently.
  7. Towards the end, once the fish is mostly cooked, add the mushrooms. Cover and cook for a couple of min until the fish flakes easily with a fork.

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Chicken Paleoindaloo

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Ok, so the name needs a little work. Open to suggestions!

Fairly often, one of my flavor cravings is indian food. So I decided to make something with a bit of spice and indian flair, my way. It’s not a particular dish, but the heat build up reminds me of a clove heavy vindaloo, which is one of my favorite dishes. I like cloves, which is why I added more than normal, but not everyone does, so you may want to cut back a little if you’re not sure. The heat definitely builds on this one – so keep that in mind if you are sensitive to spicy food.

I didn’t measure anything – so any spices in bold, I used GENEROUS amounts of. I apologize in advance if some of the pictures aren’t as nice as usual…I usually don’t photograph the cooking process (because I’m busy focusing on cooking), and didn’t have special lights to set up over the kitchen while dodging tomato splatter ha!

Ingredients:

  • 1 lb Chicken Breast
  • 3 large shallots
  • 3 large cloves of garlic
  • 2 yams or sweet potatoes – peeled and cubed
  • 1 28 oz can Cento Brand crushed tomato
  • 1 can Trader Joe’s light coconut milk
  • 2-3 cups sliced okra
  • 2 stalks celery
  • 2-3 tablespoons unsweetened cocoa powder
  • 4 whole allspice and cloves – smashed
  • Cardamom
  • Red cayenne pepper
  • Ginger
  • Hungarian paprika
  • Coriander
  • Tumeric
  • Cumin
  • Cinnamon
  • Salt

Put all spices in a ziplock with chicken and rub around as a dry rub – let marinate for 1-2 hours

Cut up and cube 2 yams or sweet potatoes and chop 3 large cloves of garlic and 3 large shallots

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garlic and shallots

Heat 2 tablespoons duck fat.

DuckFat In Pan

Using a kitchen scissors cut the chicken I to cubes or chunks and cook for a minute or two before adding the garlic and onion. Then throw them in and stir.

Chicken

After a minute add the sweet potato and stir.

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After a few minutes add the canned crushed tomato (28oz Cento brand) and coconut milk (Trader Joe’s) and stir. Cover and simmer for 5 minutes, stirring once or twice

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Add more of the spices you used earlier and 2 bay leaves, cover and let simmer. After it starts simmering hard, turn the heat down to medium – add a little lime juice.

Chop and add 2 stalks of celery and 2 cups (or 5 handfuls) frozen sliced okra.

Cover and continue to simmer and occasionally stir for 20 or so minutes until it starts to thicken as the sweet potatoes soften.

Add 2 tablespoons unsweetened cocoa powder, stir, and turn off heat.


Slow Cooker Bone Broth

So getting more and more into the paleo lifestyle, it’s not surprising that I finally decided to make a nutrient rich bone broth. I decided on the slow cooker method, because it’s easy, and I can forget about it for a day (literally). I started off looking at the recipe from Nom Nom Paleo, and pretty much followed it, with a few adjustments due to taste, and what I had on hand.

Ingredients:

  • 2 lbs Grass-Fed Beef Bones (I used marrow bones, but look for stuff with cartilage)
  • 1/2 Onion
  • 1 Large Shallot
  • 2 Large Carrots
  • 1 4″ long Fresh Ginger Root
  • 2 Stalks Celery
  • 1/8 cup Apple Cider Vinegar
  • 3 Tbsp Coconut Aminos
  • 2 Bay leaves
  • salt
  • pepper
  • Water

Chop up the onion, shallot, carrots, and celery and throw into the bottom of the crock pot. I cut them pretty large, because it didn’t matter, and I’m lazy when I can be. Peel and slice the ginger root, and throw that in too. Then put the bay leaves in and put the bones on top. sprinkle with salt and pepper, and pour the apple cider vinegar and coconut aminos over the bones. Add water until you pretty much cover the bones – but make sure you leave a little room (like 1-2″) at the top of the crock pot. I think I used 6-8 cups.

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Then let it cook on low for 24 hours or more.

I left it going for 48 hours. It seriously made my kitchen smell of corned beef and cabbage….I don’t know why….but I’m down with that.

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after it was done I took out all the solids (I saved them to eat, even though slow cooking pretty much sucks all their flavor out)

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and ran it through a strainer.

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There were still some floaty things, so i folded up a cheesecloth in the strainer, and ran it through again.

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The fat gave it a pretty pattern on top.

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I drank a cup while it was still hot, and put the rest in the refrigerator. It was thick, dark, rich, meaty, and earthy. After it cooled, I removed the solid fat from the top. Unfortunately, there must have not been enough gelatin in the bones, or cartilage, because it didn’t get “jelly” like, and stayed liquid. Next time maybe I’ll add chicken feet or look for knuckle bones. Overall, not a bad first attempt – but next time I hope to get it to its full gelatinous potential!


Sauteed Chicken Giblets!

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So I roasted a chicken for dinner tonight (two actually), nothing fancy. This time however, I didn’t throw away the bags of giblets. I used to, I didn’t quite know what to do with them, and I haven’t made gravy or chicken broth lately. I thought to myself “This is food” and asked myself why I would ever throw them away. I realized people around the world ate these things as delicacies, and people USED these things. I figured the primal thing to do, would be to embrace these innards! Don’t waste good nutritious food, that’s what it comes down to.

So the bag of giblets came with necks, and gizzards. One came with a liver as well. Gizzards are apparently a sort of seconds stomach….lovely. Both liver and gizzards are low in fat and high protein, but also high in cholesterol. They are a source of iron, zinc, and B12. The liver also is a source of Vitamin A.

As a side note, my dog i suspect is intolerant of chicken, based on past reactions to chicken based dog foods. I was curious if raw, good quality, chicken made any difference, so I gave her one of the raw necks. She thanked me.

I ate the rest of it. I washed everything, and trimmed the weird fat off the neck and gizzards. I cut the organ parts into small pieces. Heating some duck fat in a skillet, and some coconut aminos, I added the neck first. I chopped up a few cloves of garlic and a small shallot. I added them to the pan, as well as some ginger powder, salt, pepper, and the rest of the organs. I cooked until I thought everything looked done, only a few minutes, and until everything was sort of caramelized.

I’m a fan I have to say. The liver was soft and rich, and though  they were chewy, with an odd texture, the gizzards had a nice subtle flavor. The seasoning I used made me think of teriyaki, so if you are just trying this out, and aren’t very brave, it’s probably a good way to go. The neck was good, but it didn’t have much meat, so it was a little annoying. Definitely will do this with my gizzards from now on, otherwise I might save them for a stew.


Farm Stand Salad with Honey Hot Cod

Here is a little something I pulled together last night. I wanted to keep it fairly simple. Now I normally don’t add any sweeteners to my recipes – but I added a tablespoon of raw honey to this one. It’s still Paleo compliant, but it’s not Whole Life Challenge compliant because of that. For the fish, I have some things to tweak next time, mainly I think I would put the sauce on after the fish is on the plate – just because the fish gives off a lot of liquid, and waters it down. You can experiment with it. I thought it was good enough to post, and my boyfriend was like “That was really good”…so maybe I’m just being overly critical.

I actually wanted to highlight the salad today. It wasn’t crazy involved, but most of the ingredients came from the local farm stand, which is a practice I want everyone to start trying to implement. Eating seasonally is not only important for nutrition and budget, as the fresher ingredients are often cheaper and more nutrient dense in season, but it’s important to support your local farmers and farm stands, because generally the food you find there is way fresher, and way better than anything you will find in your local big chain supermarket.

I bought some beautiful arugula, red leaf lettuce, and cucumbers from the farm stand. The shallot also came from a trip there earlier in the week. The only things I added that did not come from there, was the tomatoes, some celery, and some fermented ginger carrot.

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  • Arugula
  • Red Leaf Lettuce
  • Shallot
  • Cucumber
  • Tomato
  • Celery
  • Fermented Ginger Carrots

Dressing – Olive Oil, Coconut Aminos, Lime Juice

It was beautiful and fresh, and the arugula had a wonderful full flavor spice to it that really complimented the light and refreshing taste of everything else! I think in the past I have only had baby arugula, which I love, but I didn’t realize how wonderfully strong the flavor is when full-grown!

So to go with it, I baked some Cod Filets. To make the sauce, I placed a glass bowl over a sauce pan, and set the stove to Hi. I added a tablespoon each of duck fat and raw honey, then added a few good shakes of hot sauce. Next time I am going to put the sauce on after baking, because as you can see by the picture, the liquid from the fish seriously diluted it. It was subtle and nice though. I topped with half an avocado for some added good fats.

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Duck Fat Love and Sweet Potato Wedges with Garlic and Shallots

Duck Fat. I’ve long heard of its golden status among chefs. I’ve often been told within recipes to hoard the drippings for later when cooking with duck. All of this was in the back of my mind, until I found Fatworks. [You can find a link to the website on the left sidebar of my blog]

I first heard of Fatworks from a colleague at Crossfit. I checked it out, and immediately was interested. You see, I am trying to get away from using seed oils when cooking. They are terribly unstable, have low smoke points, and are generally better suited for cold use in salads. The most stable fat I owned at this point was coconut oil, and although I’d cook everything in it, it does have a discernible taste, and my boyfriend wasn’t a fan of coconut oil on everything, so i needed options. I generally can get away with a small amount of butter, but knowing how dairy affects me, I don’t really like the idea of using it, and avoid it. This left me using olive and sesame oil, even though it’s less than ideal.

Now, Fatworks gave me access to some high quality, pure, animal fat, giving me more dairy free and stable saturated fat options to bring to my kitchen. I ordered the Duck as soon as it was back in stock. [Next thing I have to order is Tallow!] I was ecstatic when it came yesterday.

Duck Fat Yum! - Click to go to Fatworks and get some for yourself!

Duck Fat Yum! – Click to go to Fatworks and get some for yourself!

Now what to make!

It was a crossfit night, so I decided to roast a chicken. I figured the duck fat, being poultry, would go well, help bring some crispness to the skin, and give some nice flavor. I poured a spoon over the skin, rubbed it over, and then used my fingers to push some more  under the skin via the few holes I poked around the skin of the breast area. I shoved a few garlic cloves in the holes, seasoned with rosemary, salt, pepper, and orange peel, and put it in the oven. My general go to technique [As I’ve mentioned before] is to bake at 450 for 15 minutes, and 20 minutes per pound at 350 after that.

Then in the 10 minutes I had before leaving, I peeled a sweet potato and cut it into medium wedges and strips.

Went to the gym, came home to a yummy smelling house, took a shower, and took this beauty out of the oven!

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Seriously – I think this was the best looking bird I’ve roasted. Thank you Duck Fat!

While I was letting it rest, I sliced up a shallot, and two cloves of garlic and kept them off to the side. I turned the burner to medium-high, put 5 spoons or so of  the duck fat in the pan, and when it was hot, I threw the sweet potato wedges in, covered, and tossed. I let them cook for about 5-10 minutes, tossing occasionally, and then seasoned them with a little salt, cinnamon, and ground ginger. Keeping an eye on them, when I saw they were getting soft, I threw in the shallots and garlic, and tossed. Putting them in late like this, let them caramelize and crisp, without burning.

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Beautiful! The sweet potatoes, onions, and shallots all got a beautiful caramelization. The foodie in me was singing with joy and anticipation.

Now all that was left was to eat!

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Yum does not even cover it. The chicken skin was divine. It had a beautiful crispness and full flavor. The meat itself was juicy and delicious. The sweet potatoes were sweet, with a savory note, and addictive. I was beyond pleased.

I highly recommend buying some of this fabulous fat!

Complementary note – Even though I don’t drink too often anymore [When I do it’s usually red wine or spirits], I’ve been trying out some Gluten Free beers.  Especially in the heat of the summer , I find my mood longing for a beer over wine, and sometimes hard liquor can be a little harsh on my system. In the past I used to love beer, craft beer, robust beer, stouts, porters, imperial ales, I was a fan. Unfortunately, due to [likely] the grain sensitivity, they also would often give me a headache and mess my stomach up. I’ve avoided going back to them….until now!

I was curious to try some of the Gluten Free beers, to see if I had better reaction to them. So far [I’ve tried 2 different ones], my post beer experience has been night and day; no headaches, no digestive system anger. For dinner tonight I tried this one from Dogfish head, and it was very nice. Light in flavor with subtle notes of the strawberry and buckwheat honey. I will definitely be buying it again!

Gluten Free Beer!

Gluten Free Beer!


Creamy Mushroom Shallot Soup

20130608-001347.jpgshown here served with Bison Meatballs and spinach
Let me start off saying I LOVE Trader Joe’s Light Coconut Milk. It’s cheap ($1 a can) and versatile. I’ve used it for smoothies, curries, soups, and beyond – as well as adding it in small amounts here and there.

This recipe started initially as a mushroom gravy – simmering mushrooms in a little coconut milk until it took on a mushroomy color and the flavors melded together a bit. Then one night, the boyfriend decided he wanted a “creamy soup”, so it popped into my head to take the gravy one step more and make a cream soup. We were both really happy with the results…and the simplicity!

Creamy Mushroom Soup

2 shallots
3 cloves garlic
1 tablespoon coconut aminos
1 tablespoon coconut oil
1/8 cup vegetable broth
1 package sliced shiitake mushrooms
1 package baby Bella mushrooms (sliced)
3 cans trader joes coconut milk
Salt, pepper, sage, thyme

Combine everything but the coconut milk in a pot and let cook over medium heat until mushrooms begin to soften

Add coconut milk turn heat up to medium-high and when it starts to bubble turn back to medium. let simmer until it starts turning brownish (mushroomy color) – keeping an eye on it and stirring as needed.

I would cover it sometimes, but my pot was too small and I was worried about it boiling over.


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